Style

Oscar Niemeyer, born in 1907, is the godfather of modern Brazilian architecture. His organic buildings seem to flow from the landscape but remain striking in scale and construction. Architects today like Zaha Hadid and Santiago Calatrava owe a debt to his highly mathematical approach to bold forms and pioneering use of reinforced concrete.

Career Highlights

After graduating from the Escola Nacional de Belas Artes in Rio in 1934, he began working on a collaborative project with Le Corbusier in Rio de Janeiro. He was later appointed chief architect of Brazil’s new capital, Brasilia. In 1988, he won the Pritzker Architecture Prize.

Best known for

His most famous piece is the ‘Rio’ chaise longue, which consists of three loops of moulded plywood supporting a laminated timber frame with cane woven across it. The shape of it is extraordinary.

The Catedral Metropolitana in Brasilia, by architect Oscar Niemeyer, is a major landmark.

Fasem ‘Rio’ chaise longue.